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Definition

George, J. et al. (2017) Measurement of father-child rough-and-tumble play and its relations to child behaviour: Measurement of rough-and-tumble play (Journal Article)

Hoicka, E. et al. (2012) Early humour production (Journal Article)

Abstract:

The current studies explored early humour as a complex socio-cognitive phenomenon by examining 2- and 3-year-olds’ humour production with their parents. We examined whether children produced novel humour, whether they cued their humour, and the types of humour produced. Forty-seven parents were interviewed, and videotaped joking with their children. Other parents (N= 113) completed a survey. Parents reported children copy jokes during the first year of life, and produce novel jokes from 2 years. In play sessions, 3-year-olds produced mostly novel humorous acts; 2-year-olds produced novel and copied humorous acts equally frequently. Parents reported children smile, laugh, and look for a reaction when joking. In play sessions, 2- and 3-year-olds produced these behaviours more when producing humorous versus non-humorous acts. In both parent reports and play sessions, they produced novel object-based (e.g., underwear on head) and conceptual humour (e.g., ‘pig says moo’) and used wrong labels humorously (e.g., calling a cat a dog). Thus, parent report and child behaviour both confirm that young children produce novel humorous acts, and share their humour by smiling, laughing, and looking for a reaction.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2012
Volume:
30
Page/s:
586–603
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Humour
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Social cognition
  • Social-emotional
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Hoicka, E. et al. (2016) Parents Produce Explicit Cues That Help Toddlers Distinguish Joking and Pretending (Journal Article)

Abstract:

While separate pieces of research found parents offer toddlers cues to express that they are (1) joking and (2) pretending, and that toddlers and preschoolers understand intentions to (1) joke and (2) pretend, it is not yet clear whether parents and toddlers consider joking and pretending to be distinct concepts. This is important as distinguishing these two forms of non-literal acts could open a gateway to understanding the complexities of the non-literal world, as well as the complexities of intentions in general. Two studies found parents offer explicit cues to help 16- to 24-month-olds distinguish pretending and joking. Across an action play study (n = 25) and a verbal play study (n = 40) parents showed more disbelief and less belief through their actions and language when joking versus pretending. Similarly, toddlers showed less belief through their actions, and older toddlers showed less belief through their language. Toddlers' disbelief could be accounted for by their response to parents' language and actions. Thus, these studies reveal a mechanism by which toddlers learn to distinguish joking and pretending. Parents offer explicit cues to distinguish these intentions, and toddlers use these cues to guide their own behaviors, which in turn allows toddlers to distinguish these intentional contexts.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2016
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
40
Page/s:
941-971
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Humour
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Pretend play
  • Social cognition
  • Social-emotional
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Johnson, J. et al. (2015) The Handbook of the Study of Play (Book)

Abstract:

The Handbook of the Study of Play brings together in two volumes thinkers whose diverse interests at the leading edge of scholarship and practice define the current field. Because play is an activity that humans have shared across time, place, and culture and in their personal developmental timelines—and because this behavior stretches deep into the evolutionary past—no single discipline can lay claim to exclusive rights to study the subject. Thus this handbook features the thinking of evolutionary psychologists; ethologists and biologists; neuroscientists; developmental psychologists; psychotherapists and play therapists; historians; sociologists and anthropologists; cultural psychologists; philosophers; theorists of music, performance, and dance; specialists in learning and language acquisition; and playground designers. Together, but out of their varied understandings, the incisive contributions to The Handbook take on vital questions of educational policy, of literacy, of fitness, of the role of play in brain development, of spontaneity and pleasure, of well-being and happiness, of fairness, and of the fuller realization of the self. These volumes also comprise an intellectual history, retrospective looks at the great thinkers who have made possible the modern study of play.

Date:
January 2015
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
II
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Learning
  • Mental health
  • Musical play
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Physical play
  • Playground
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:

Karpov, Y. (2005) The Neo-Vygotskian Approach to Child Development (Book)

Abstract:

THE NEO-VYGOTSKIAN APPROACH TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT
For the first time, the neo-Vygotskian approach to child development is intro- duced to English-speaking readers. Russian followers of Vygotsky have elaborated his ideas into a theory that integrates cognitive, motivational, and social aspects of child development with an emphasis on the role of children’s activity as mediated by adults in their development. This theory has become the basis for an innova- tive analysis of periods in child development and of the mechanism of children’s transitions from one period to the next. In this book, the discussion of the neo- Vygotskians’ approach to child development is supported by a review of their em- pirical data, much of which have never before been available to English-speaking readers. The discussion is also supported by a review of recent empirical find- ings ofWestern researchers, which are highly consistent with the neo-Vygotskian analysis of child development.
Yuriy V. Karpov is Professor and Associate Dean at the Graduate School of Education and Psychology of Touro College. He did his undergraduate and grad- uate studies and then worked as a faculty member at the School of Psychology of Moscow State University, the center of Vygotsky-based studies in the former Soviet Union. His studies on the implementation of Vygotsky’s ideas in educa- tion, psychological assessment, and the analysis of child development have been published as books, chapters, and journal articles in Russian, English, and Spanish.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2005
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Cultural context
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Object play
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pretend play
  • Social-emotional
Research discipline:

Mireault, G. et al. (2015) Laughing matters: Infant humor in the context of parental affect (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Smiling and laughing appear very early during the first year of life, but little is known about how infants come to appraise a stimulus as humorous. This short-term longitudinal study explored infant humor perception from 5 to 7months of age as a function of parental affect during an absurd event. Using a within-participants design, parents alternated smiling/laughing with emotional neutrality while acting absurdly toward their infants. Group comparisons showed that infants (N=37) at all ages smiled at the event regardless of parental affect but did so significantly longer at 5 and 6months, and more often and sooner at 7months, when parents provided humor cues. Similarly, sequential analyses revealed that after gazing at the event, 7-month-olds were more likely to smile at it only when parents provided humor cues and were comparatively more likely to look away when parents were neutral. Thus, starting at 5months of age, parental affect influenced infants’ affect toward an absurd event, an effect that was magnified at 7months. These results are discussed in the context of emotional contagion, regulation, and the emergence of social referencing.

Date:
January 2015
Volume:
136
Page/s:
30-41
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Humour
  • Longitudinal
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Play with Mother
  • Social cognition
  • Social play
  • Social-emotional
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Nathan, P. et al. (2010) The Oxford Handbook of the Development of Play (Book)

Abstract:

The role of play in human development has long been the subject of controversy. Despite being championed by many of the foremost scholars of the twentieth century, play has been dogged by underrepresentation and marginalization in literature across the scientific disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of the Development of Play attempts to examine the development of children’s play through a rigorous and multidisciplinary approach. This book aims to reset the landscape of developmental science and makes a compelling case for the benefits of play.

Date:
January 2010
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Atypical development
  • Cultural context
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Object play
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Physical play
  • Play assessment
  • Play with Mother
  • Pretend play
  • Rough and tumble
  • Social play
  • Social-emotional

NCCA, . et al. (2017) Why is play important for babies and toddlers (Birth-3 years) from NCCA on Vimeo (Video Recording)

Abstract:
Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Creativity
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Exploratory play
  • Functional play
  • Language
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Playfulness
  • Self-regulation
  • Social-emotional
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

PEDAL, . et al. (2017) PEDAL Seminar: Play, self-regulation and early childhood - What does research say? (Video Recording)

Abstract:

A rare opportunity to hear from two of the world's foremost developmental psychologists about how their research has been applied to education and social policy.

Of particular interest to academics, teachers, early years practitioners, and third/public sector professionals, Professor Blair and Professor Sylva will highlight the effects of early education on development, attainment and fulfilling individual potential.

Prof Sylva's talk is entitled 'Nurturing 21st century skills in early childhood: evidence from the English EPPSE study and the EU CARE project'

Prof Blair's talk is entitled 'The Science of Self-Regulation: Supporting Executive Function Development in Early Childhood Through Play'

There will be time for a chaired Q&A session at the end of the talks and refreshments will be provided.

Professor Clancy Blair is a developmental psychologist who studies self-regulation in young children. His primary interest concerns the development of cognitive abilities referred to as executive functions and the ways in which these aspects of cognition are important for school readiness and early school achievement. He is also interested in the development and evaluation of pre-school and elementary school curricula designed to promote executive functions as a means of preventing school failure. In 2002, Blair and his colleagues at Penn State University and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill received funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for a longitudinal, population-based study of family ecology and child development beginning at birth. In his part of the project, Blair is examining interaction between early experiential and biological influences on the development of executive functions and related aspects of self-regulation. Ultimately, Blair and his colleagues plan to follow this sample through the school years and into young adulthood. Prior to coming to NYU, Blair spent ten years as an assistant and then associate professor in the department of Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State. He received his doctorate in developmental psychology and a master's degree in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1996.

After completing a doctorate in Developmental Psychology at Harvard, Professor Kathy Sylva moved to England for post-doctoral research with Jerome Bruner at the University of Oxford Department of Experimental Psychology. Her research interests fall into two themes. She has conducted several large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children's development, acting as a lead researcher on the Effective Pre-school and Primary Education study (EPPE/EPPSE) which followed 3,000 children from pre-school entry to the end of compulsory schooling. She co-led the national Evaluation of Childrens Centres in England, another large scale study on the effects of early childhood services on development. Her second interest is in parenting programmes aimed at enhancing parents capacity to support their childs learning and behaviour. She has led three randomised controlled trials to evaluate parenting interventions, the most recent on a parent programme aimed at supporting early reading near the start of primary school. Currently Kathy is researching the early childhood curriculum across Europe, funded by the EU. Kathy has published seven books and 200 papers/chapters/reports on early education/care, early literacy and ways to support families. She was Specialist Adviser to the UK Parliamentary Select Committee on Education 2000-2009, the Tickell Review of the early childhood curriculum in 2011, and the National College Expert Panel on Standards for Early Years Teachers in 2012. In 2014-15 she was specialist advisor to the House of Lords Enquiry into Affordable Childcare. She was awarded an OBE in 2008 for services to children and families and in 2014 was awarded the British Education Associations Nisbett Award for outstanding contribution to educational research. She was elected Fellow of the British Psychological Society and also a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Affective behaviour
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Longitudinal
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Self-regulation
  • Social play
  • Social-emotional
  • Executive function
Relevant age group/s:

PEDAL, . et al. (2018) PEDAL Seminar: Not Too Early, But Just Right! - Unleashing the Power of Science in Early Childhood (Video Recording)

Abstract:

Professor Greenfield is a Professor of Psychology and Pediatrics at the University of Miami. His work is positioned at the interface of research, policy and practice at the international, national and local level. His research examines school readiness with at-risk and dual language learners, with a specific focus on early science education.

Science has the power to engage early childhood educators and young children in hands-on, minds-on, fun and engaging experiences that increase the quality of teaching as well as provide young children with critical problem-solving skills and improved learning in multiple school readiness areas. In this PEDAL research seminar, Professor Greenfield discusses the role of science in early education in relation to research, as well as current policy and practice.

This lecture forms part of the PEDAL Research Seminar series
http://www.educ.cam.ac.uk/centres/pedal
@PEDALCam

Author/s:
Date:
January 2018
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Executive function
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Science
  • Self-regulation
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline: