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Farver, J. et al. (2000) Within Cultural Differences: Examining Individual Differences in Korean American and European American Preschoolers' Social Pretend Play (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Individual differences in 30Korean American and 30 European American preschoolers’ play behavior were examined to understand how intracultural variations in children’s skills and behavioral characteristics may be associated with social pretend play in early childhood. Observers recorded the children’s social behaviors and play complexity. Teachers rated children’s social behavior, parents completed a child rearing question- naire, and children were given the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelli- gence–Revised and the Multidimensional Stimulus Fluency Measure. The findings showed that there were similar patterns predictive of pretend play for both groups.Over- all, children’s interactive style, positive social interaction with peers, and creativity scores significantly predicted pretend play. The results suggest that individual factors related to pretend play transcend culture.

Date:
January 2000
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
31
Page/s:
583-602
Synonyms:
  • Correlational
  • Creativity
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Free play
  • Language
  • Pretend play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Lee, Y. et al. (2012) Are there cultural differences in how we play? Examining cultural effects on playing social network games (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Digital games embedded in social network sites are one of the driving forces behind the expansion of digital gamer populations. Previous studies have observed different usage patterns between users in different ethnic groups and countries, suggesting that culture orientations may affect how people play and interact through social network games. This study examined how people's culture orientations affect usage patterns with measures of vertical and horizontal individualism-collectivism. The findings indicate that culture does not directly affect usage patterns. Instead, the effects on usage patterns are mediated by people's expected outcomes of playing social network games. Vertical culture orientations predicted social expected outcomes. Individualism predicted status expected outcomes, but in different directions on the dimensions of vertical or horizontalness. Vertical collectivism was the only culture orientation that indirectly predicted buying in-game products with real money. Implications for game designers and markers are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2012
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
28
Page/s:
1307-1314
Synonyms:
  • Digital play
  • Games with rules
  • Social play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Vandermaas-Peeler, M. (2002) Cultural Variations in Parental Support of Children's Play (Journal Article)

Abstract:

The purpose of this reading is to highlight the importance of play for children's development and to examine the role of parents in supporting children's play in various cultures. Although play is believed to be universal, the amount of attention devoted to play in a particular society depends in part on the cultural beliefs about the nature of childhood, and on the adults' specific goals for their young children. Researchers have found that some parents consider themselves appropriate social partners for their young children, but in many communities it is older siblings and peers who are the children's primary play partners. Regardless of their direct involvement in the on-going play activities, parents often provide support and guidance for children's play.

Date:
January 2002
Volume:
6
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Literature review
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pretend play
  • Social play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline: