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Jarvis, P. et al. (2014) On ‘becoming social’: the importance of collaborative free play in childhood (Journal Article)

Abstract:

There is increasing concern about declining mental health amongst children in the UK and the USA. Evolutionary and anthropological theorists have begun to build a theory linking this situation to decreasing opportunities to engage in free play. This paper will explore typical contexts for children in these nations, concluding that a range of recently emerging environments have decreased opportunities for collaborative peer free play and ‘discovery’ activities for the current generation. We will draw the theoretical analysis from a broad area of research encompassing psychology, anthropology, education, sociology, marketing, and philosophy to offer a new blend of practical and theoretical perspectives that may shed further light upon this topic.

Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
3
Page/s:
53-68
Synonyms:
  • Free play
  • Literature review
  • Mental health
  • Outdoor play
  • Peers play
  • Social play
  • Well-being outcomes
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

O’Sullivan, L. et al. (2018) Play as learning: implications for educators and parents from findings of a national evaluation of school readiness in Ireland (Journal Article)

Abstract:
Date:
September 2018
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
7
Page/s:
266-289
Keyword/s:
Synonyms:
  • Learning
  • Pedagogy
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Roopnarine, J. et al. (2018) Paternal and maternal engagement in play, story telling, and reading in five Caribbean countries: associations with preschoolers’ literacy skills (Journal Article)

Whitebread, D. et al. (2012) Preschool children's social pretend play: supporting the development of metacommunication, metacognition and self-regulation (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This paper presents an overview of the conceptual, developmental and functional aspects of metacommunication in preschool children's social pretend play. While the relationship between the representational aspects of social pretend play and positive developmental outcomes is well researched, metacommunicaton in social pretend play remains a largely under-researched phenomenon. A definition of social pretend play is proposed leading to propositions as to its specific functions for young children's learning and development. In particular, it is hypothesised that the development of metacommunication during social pretend play may make an important contribution to the early development of metacognition and self-regulation. Having proposed these specific functions for metacommunication, the implications of this for adult involvement in naturally occurring social pretend play are discussed. Identifying more specifically the components of social pretend play which support specific aspects of learning can inform pedagogical innovations, and the realisation of the full educational potential of social pretend play. While this review highlights some important conceptual, developmental and pedagogical issues in relation to metacommunicaton in social pretend play, these aspects clearly require elaboration. Suggestions are made for further research on metacommunciation development, and the conditions which support its emergence and development.

Date:
January 2012
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
1
Page/s:
197-213
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Literature review
  • Metacognition
  • Pedagogy
  • Peers play
  • Pretend play
  • Self-regulation
  • Social cognition
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Zachariou, A. et al. (2015) Musical play and self-regulation: does musical play allow for the emergence of self-regulatory behaviours? (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This paper is a pioneering attempt to bring together the notions of musical play and self-regulation and reports on a study aiming to explore 6-year-old children's self-regulation during musical play. While musical play is one of the first manifestations of musicality, a fundamental aspect of human functioning [Trevarthen, C. (2000). Musicality and the intrinsic motive pulse: Evidence from human psychobiology and infant communication. Musicae Scientiae, 3(1), 155–215], self-regulation is crucial in children's learning. Self-regulatory abilities flourish in playful contexts [Bruner, J. S. (1972). Nature and uses of immaturity. American Psychologist, 27(8), 687–708], since play's specific characteristics promote self-regulatory development. Even though musical play shows these characteristics, its relationship with self-regulation is under-researched. This paper presents observations of ten 6-year-old children while they were engaged in musical play sessions. Having adopted a mixed-methods approach, the results suggested that musical play allowed for self-regulatory behaviours to emerge. An understanding of the link between musical play and self-regulation could inform not only the theoretical underpinnings suggesting a relationship between play and self-regulation, but also current teaching practice in relation to music education.

Date:
January 2015
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
4
Page/s:
116-135
Synonyms:
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Guided-play
  • Metacognition
  • Musical play
  • Playful learning
  • Self-regulation
  • Semiotic play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline: