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PEDAL Hub Library

We’ve rounded up a set of high-quality play resources for you to explore. The library houses a collection of links that will take you to peer-reviewed publications, videos of play experts, and websites that may be of interest to you.

You can use the filters below to find the resources that best match your interests. The library can be sorted by format (journal papers, videos, blogs etc.), child age, and type of play.

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Longitudinal Associations Between Humor Styles and Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescence

This study assessed the concurrent and prospective associations between psychosocial adjustment and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Participants were 1,234 adolescents (52% female) aged 11-13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports of psychosocial adjustment (loneliness, depressive symptomatology, and self-esteem) and humor styles […]

Title: Longitudinal Associations Between Humor Styles and Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescence
Abstract:

This study assessed the concurrent and prospective associations between psychosocial adjustment and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Participants were 1,234 adolescents (52% female) aged 11-13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports of psychosocial adjustment (loneliness, depressive symptomatology, and self-esteem) and humor styles were collected at two time points (fall and summer). In cross-lagged panel analyses, self-defeating humor was associated with an increase in both depressive symptoms and loneliness, and with a decrease in self-esteem. In addition, depressive symptoms predicted an increase in the use of self-defeating humor over time, indicating that these may represent a problematic spiral of thoughts and behaviors. Self-esteem was associated with an increase in the use of affiliative humor over the school year but not vice-versa. These results inform our understanding of the ways in which humor is associated with psychosocial adjustment in adolescence.

Publication year: 2016
Date: 19/08/2016
Volume: 12
Page/s: 377-389

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