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Definition

Baker, F. (2014) Tensions in Policy and Practice: Influences on Play in Abu Dhabi's New School Model KG Framework (Journal Article)

Abstract:

This article reports on three salient socio-cultural and systemic factors that are influential in play in Abu Dhabi Education Council's (ADEC's) kindergarten (KG) framework from the teacher perspective. Anecdotal evidence suggests that during ADEC's progressive educational reform, emphasis has reverted to academic performance outcomes rather than whole child learning through play. Tensions may then occur surrounding the nature and extent of play practices for early learning. Following semi-structured interviews with 60 KG teachers, three salient factors emerged. These are illustrated in this article and discussed in light of the international literature on play. Tensions in policy and practice highlighted in this article are: a focus on academic performance outcomes; children's readiness to engage in play and parent perspectives on play. The article then discusses what these tensions may mean for the future of play in ADEC KGs situated within a period of educational reform.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
184
Page/s:
1830-1842
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Playful learning
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Qualitative methodology
Relevant age group/s:

BBC, . et al. (2017) PEDAL | BBC Breakfast report on playful writing (Video Recording)

Abstract:

Acting Director of PEDAL Centre, David Whitebread, is interviewed in BBC Breakfast report on playful writing.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Creativity
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Engagement
  • Guided-play
  • Learning
  • Playful learning
  • Pretend play
  • Social-emotional
  • Construction play
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Bleeker, M. et al. (4/17) Findings from a Randomized Experiment of Playworks: Selected Results from Cohort 1 (Book)

EEF, . (2017) Education Endowment Foundation (Web Page)

Abstract:

The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) is an independent charity dedicated to breaking the link between family income and educational achievement. We aim to: raise the attainment of 3-18 year-olds, particularly those facing disadvantage; develop their essential life skills;
and prepare young people for the world of work and further study.
We support teachers and senior leaders by providing free, independent and evidence-based resources designed to improve practice and boost learning.
We do this by generating evidence of what works to improve teaching and learning, funding rigorous trials of promising but untested programmes and approaches.
We then support schools, as well as early years and post-16 settings, across the country in using evidence to achieve the maximum possible benefit for young people.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • At-risk
  • Socio-economic background
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline:

Fung, C. et al. (2012) Consensus or Dissensus? Stakeholders' Views on the Role of Play in Learning (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Across cultures and eras, children have engaged in play as part of the process of growing and maturing into adulthood. Play has been recognized as an effective form of pedagogy to promote learning in the early years. However, beliefs about what play is and how it should be practiced vary across Hong Kong and in other countries. Because Chinese culture places a heavy emphasis on academic achievement, a play-based curriculum has not been widely implemented in the region. Through classroom observations and interviews with key stakeholders in early childhood education, namely parents, teachers, and principals, this study reveals the complexity of views on this matter and uncovers the root cause of the difficulties in supporting play in the Hong Kong kindergartens. These findings may help promote the play-based curriculum in Hong Kong and other countries where play is in crisis. (Contains 1 table.)

Date:
January 2012
Volume:
32
Page/s:
17-33
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Cultural context
  • Playful learning
  • Qualitative methodology
Relevant age group/s:

Lillard, A. et al. (2006) The early years: Evaluating Montessori education (Journal Article)

Abstract:

Please click on the link provided below to read the abstract.

Date:
January 2006
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
313
Page/s:
1893–1894
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Social-emotional
  • Executive function
Relevant age group/s:

McGuinness, C. et al. (2014) Impact of a play-based curriculum in the first two years of primary school: literacy and numeracy outcomes over seven years (Journal Article)

Abstract:

In 2000–2002 an innovative early years curriculum, the Enriched Curriculum (EC), was introduced into 120 volunteer schools across Northern Ireland, replacing a traditional curriculum similar to others across the UK at that time. It was intended by the designers to be developmentally appropriate and play-based with the primary goal of preventing the experience of persistent early failure in children. The EC was not intended to be a literacy and numeracy intervention, yet it did considerably alter pedagogy in these domains, particularly the age at which formal reading and mathematics instruction began. As part of a multi-method evaluation running from 2000–2008, the research team followed the primary school careers of the first two successive cohorts of EC children, comparing them with year-ahead controls attending the same 24 schools. Compared to the year-ahead control group, the findings show that the EC children's reading and mathematics scores fell behind in the first two years but the majority of EC children caught up by the end of their fourth year. Thereafter, the performance of the first EC cohort fell away slightly, while that of the second continued to match that of controls. Overall, the play-based curriculum had no statistically significant positive effects on reading and mathematics in the medium term. At best, the EC children's scores matched those of controls.

Date:
January 2014
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
40
Page/s:
772-795
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Literacy
  • Longitudinal
  • Numeracy
  • Playful learning
Relevant age group/s:

PEDAL, . et al. (2016) PEDAL Seminar: Self-regulation - Foundation skills for children's healthy development (Video Recording)

Abstract:

Part of the PEDAL Seminar series this video shows the recording of the recent seminar hosted by PEDAL and the Psychology & Education research group at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge.

Introduced by PEDAL acting Director Dr David Whitebread from the Faculty of Education and presented by Dr Megan McClelland, Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children & Families, Oregon State University.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2016
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Self-regulation
  • Semiotic play
  • Executive function
Relevant age group/s:

PEDAL, . et al. (2017) PEDAL Seminar: Play, self-regulation and early childhood - What does research say? (Video Recording)

Abstract:

A rare opportunity to hear from two of the world's foremost developmental psychologists about how their research has been applied to education and social policy.

Of particular interest to academics, teachers, early years practitioners, and third/public sector professionals, Professor Blair and Professor Sylva will highlight the effects of early education on development, attainment and fulfilling individual potential.

Prof Sylva's talk is entitled 'Nurturing 21st century skills in early childhood: evidence from the English EPPSE study and the EU CARE project'

Prof Blair's talk is entitled 'The Science of Self-Regulation: Supporting Executive Function Development in Early Childhood Through Play'

There will be time for a chaired Q&A session at the end of the talks and refreshments will be provided.

Professor Clancy Blair is a developmental psychologist who studies self-regulation in young children. His primary interest concerns the development of cognitive abilities referred to as executive functions and the ways in which these aspects of cognition are important for school readiness and early school achievement. He is also interested in the development and evaluation of pre-school and elementary school curricula designed to promote executive functions as a means of preventing school failure. In 2002, Blair and his colleagues at Penn State University and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill received funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for a longitudinal, population-based study of family ecology and child development beginning at birth. In his part of the project, Blair is examining interaction between early experiential and biological influences on the development of executive functions and related aspects of self-regulation. Ultimately, Blair and his colleagues plan to follow this sample through the school years and into young adulthood. Prior to coming to NYU, Blair spent ten years as an assistant and then associate professor in the department of Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State. He received his doctorate in developmental psychology and a master's degree in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1996.

After completing a doctorate in Developmental Psychology at Harvard, Professor Kathy Sylva moved to England for post-doctoral research with Jerome Bruner at the University of Oxford Department of Experimental Psychology. Her research interests fall into two themes. She has conducted several large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children's development, acting as a lead researcher on the Effective Pre-school and Primary Education study (EPPE/EPPSE) which followed 3,000 children from pre-school entry to the end of compulsory schooling. She co-led the national Evaluation of Childrens Centres in England, another large scale study on the effects of early childhood services on development. Her second interest is in parenting programmes aimed at enhancing parents capacity to support their childs learning and behaviour. She has led three randomised controlled trials to evaluate parenting interventions, the most recent on a parent programme aimed at supporting early reading near the start of primary school. Currently Kathy is researching the early childhood curriculum across Europe, funded by the EU. Kathy has published seven books and 200 papers/chapters/reports on early education/care, early literacy and ways to support families. She was Specialist Adviser to the UK Parliamentary Select Committee on Education 2000-2009, the Tickell Review of the early childhood curriculum in 2011, and the National College Expert Panel on Standards for Early Years Teachers in 2012. In 2014-15 she was specialist advisor to the House of Lords Enquiry into Affordable Childcare. She was awarded an OBE in 2008 for services to children and families and in 2014 was awarded the British Education Associations Nisbett Award for outstanding contribution to educational research. She was elected Fellow of the British Psychological Society and also a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Author/s:
Date:
January 2017
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Affective behaviour
  • Developmental outcomes
  • Games with rules
  • Longitudinal
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Self-regulation
  • Social play
  • Social-emotional
  • Executive function
Relevant age group/s:

PEDAL, . et al. (2018) PEDAL Seminar: Not Too Early, But Just Right! - Unleashing the Power of Science in Early Childhood (Video Recording)

Abstract:

Professor Greenfield is a Professor of Psychology and Pediatrics at the University of Miami. His work is positioned at the interface of research, policy and practice at the international, national and local level. His research examines school readiness with at-risk and dual language learners, with a specific focus on early science education.

Science has the power to engage early childhood educators and young children in hands-on, minds-on, fun and engaging experiences that increase the quality of teaching as well as provide young children with critical problem-solving skills and improved learning in multiple school readiness areas. In this PEDAL research seminar, Professor Greenfield discusses the role of science in early education in relation to research, as well as current policy and practice.

This lecture forms part of the PEDAL Research Seminar series
http://www.educ.cam.ac.uk/centres/pedal
@PEDALCam

Author/s:
Date:
January 2018
Publisher or Journal:
Volume:
Page/s:
Synonyms:
  • Academic achievement
  • Academic outcomes
  • Executive function
  • Parent/Guardian play
  • Peers play
  • Pre-academic skills
  • Science
  • Self-regulation
Relevant age group/s:
Research discipline: